"Where Pets are Family, Too!"

78 Shaw's Ridge Road
Sanford, Maine 04073

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Hot Weather Pet Tips



NEVER LEAVE YOUR PETS IN THE CAR
In nice weather you may be tempted to take your pet with you in the car while you travel or do errands. But during warm weather, the inside of your car can reach 120 degrees in a matter of minutes, even if you're parked in the shade. This can mean real trouble for your companion animals left in the car. Dogs and cats can't perspire and can only dispel heat by panting and through the pads of their feet. Pets who are left in hot cars even briefly can suffer from heat exhaustion, heat stroke, brain damage and can even die. Don't think that just because you'll be gone "just a minute" that your pet will be safe while you're gone; even an air-conditioned car with the motor off isn't healthy for your pet. To avoid any chance that your pet will succumb to the heat of a car this summer, be sure to play it safe by leaving your pet cool and refreshed at home while you're on the road. And if you do happen to see a pet in a car alone during the hot summer months, alert the management of the store where the car is parked. If the owner does not return promptly, call local animal control or the police department immediately.


EXERCISE TIPS
Don't force your animal to exercise after a meal in hot, humid weather. Always exercise him or her in the cool of the early morning or evening. In extremely hot weather, don't leave your dog standing on the street, and keep walks to a minimum. He is much closer to the hot asphalt and his body can heat up quickly. His paws can burn since they are not protected by shoes.

Never take an animal to the beach unless you can provide a shaded spot and plenty of fresh water for her to drink. Rinse her off after she has been in salt water.

Always provide plenty of shade for an animal staying outside the house. A properly constructed dog house serves best. Bring your dog or cat inside during the heat of the day and let her rest in a cool part of your house. Always provide plenty of cool, clean water for your animal.
Please be sensitive to old and overweight animals in hot weather. Brachycephalic (snub-nosed) dogs (especially bulldogs, Pekingese, Boston terriers, Lhasa apsos and shih tzus) and those with heart or lung diseases should be kept indoors in air-conditioning as much as possible.

DON'T LET YOUR PET RIDE IN THE BACK OF YOUR TRUCK
It is very dangerous, and in some states illegal, to drive with a dog in the back of a pickup truck. Not only can flying debris cause serious injury, but a dog may be unintentionally thrown into traffic if the driver suddenly hits the brakes, swerves, or is hit by another car. Dogs should ride either in the cab (in a crate or wearing a seat belt harness designed for dogs) or in a secured crate in the bed of the truck.

RODENTICIDES
Rodenticide poisoning is the accidental ingestion of products used to kill "rodents" such as mice, rats and gophers. These products are common and accidental exposure is frequent. Poisoning is most commonly caused by ingestion of a product containing one of the following ingredients: Bromethalin, Cholecalciferol (Vitamin D3), Strychnine, Zinc phosphide, Anticoagulant (warfarin, fumarin, chlorophacinone, diphacinone, difethialone, pindone, bromadiolone, brodaficoum). Younger and older pets tend to be more sensitive to the affects of toxicity and underlying liver disease can exacerbate toxicity. The impact on the poisoned animal varies depending on the type of poison ingested. An animal may develop a bleeding disorder, neurological problems, gastrointestinal distress or kidney failure. In some cases, rodenticide poisoning is fatal.


FERTILIZERS, DEADLY PLANTS, COCOA MULCH
Summer is often a time when people fertilize their lawns and work in their gardens. But beware: Plant food, fertilizer, insecticides and cocoa mulch can be fatal if your pet ingests them. In addition, more than 700 plants can produce physiologically active or toxic substances in sufficient amounts to cause harmful effects in animals. Click here for a list of toxic plants.

DIETARY INDISCRETION
We all like to include our pets at BBQs along with the rest of the family, but try to keep in mind that sudden rich diet changes are likely to upset a petís stomach. Vomiting and diarrhea are not uncommon. If leftovers are of an especially fatty nature, the pancreas may become inflamed and overloaded. This condition is serious, painful and may require hospitalization.

HOME AGAIN!
Make sure your pet is always wearing a collar and identification tag and keep a current license. If you are separated from your pet, an ID tag may very well be his or her ticket home. Consider microchipping your pet as a means of permanent identification.

Never let your animal run loose. This is how an animal can contract a fatal disease, including rabies, or be injured, killed or stolen. Be sure there are no open, unscreened windows or doors through which your animal can fall or jump.

WATER WISDOM
Pets and pools can equal disaster. Prevent free access to pools and always supervise a pet in a pool. Provide plenty of water and shade for your pets while they're enjoying the great outdoors so they can stay cool.

FIREWORKS
Holiday fireworks and other fanfare are often frightful experiences for dogs. The loud noises can hurt their sensitive ears. Frightened dogs have different reactions: some tremble at their owners' feet, others retreat to a hiding place, some try to run off (traveling for miles), and others display bizarre behavior. Leave your pets home if you plan on going to watch fireworks displays!

ANTIFREEZE TOXICITY
Be alert for coolant leaking from your vehicle. Animals are attracted to the sweet taste of coolant and ingesting just a small amount can cause an animal's death. Consider using animal-friendly products that use propylene glycol rather than those containing ethylene glycol.

For your outdoor bunny friends... it's a great idea to freeze water filled soda bottles and place them in their pens. This way they can lay up next to them to cool down. Rabbits only loose heat through their ears, so they can overheat easily. Along with frozen water bottles make sure they have a shady area to get to.

Past Tips

Feline Urethral Obstruction

Holiday Hazards!
Heartworm
Emergencies!
Cold Weather Tips & Holiday Hazards

Fleas: Know Your Enemy!

 





 

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